Post War Years – Galapagos

It seems we have found the anthem for a new coming generation in music. It all starts here. Galapagos has truly taken us on a voyage beyond what other contemporary “electonica” outfits are capable of. Although this may be their second album, Galapagos is the formal start of their musical career to come.  With last year’s EP teasers, The Bell and Glass House, making an opening appearance on the new release, these twelve-month old classics are beset by All Eyes and Be Someone which provides us with a sinister upbeat quality.  After its namesake, the intrigue fuelled by the archipelago made famous by Darwin resonates in the album as there is an untouched and relatively pure sensation in the mid-way track Growl, with soft vowels dogged by howling vocals: a subtle grandeur resides in the corners of this album. With the dystopian fall of Lost Winter, our island is now bathed in night and we stand at the foot of the darker side of the band’s abilities.

The heady, synth-ridden marching sounds of Mollotron and Volcano both wink nostalgically back at their first album. The alter pop-like riffs that drew in so many of the first listeners now only serves as a guise which reveals itself, on further listens, to be more intricate and more deliberately imperfect than we thought at first. The last track, God, brings us to a gradual halt – the eternal infused with the ephemeral as the vocals peter off and the bass dies into a cold and lonely distance.  Coupled with near infamous visuals to be found on their website, Galapagos is full of beautiful drops and breathtaking views. This album is not just a holiday destination but a permanent home for anyone who wants to see what the band has to offer next.

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